About

Bringing together a uniquely interdisciplinary team of scientists, filmmakers and industry leaders 3D FLIC (3D Film Innovation Consortium) bridges fundamental research in stereoscopic perception with the development of stereoscopic 3D (S3D) film language and production, while building the capacity of the S3D production clusters in the Greater Toronto Area.

Initiated by York University,  the 3D Film Innovation Consortium brings together a uniquely interdisciplinary team of scientists, creators and industry leaders to solidify Toronto’s place in the international S3D arena.

A SHORT HISTORYThe genesis of the 3D FLIC project lies in the coming together of various initiatives at York University and the larger film industry in Toronto.

In late 2008, Ali Kazimi, filmmaker and associate professor in the Department of Film, started leading the move towards stereoscopic 3D cinema production within the Future Cinema Lab at York University. York University had had a rich history of scientific research in stereoscopic vision, however it had not been tied to the Department of Film. Since the 90’s professors Laurie Wilcox and Rob Allison at the Centre for Vision Research, had been conducting fundamental research on stereoscopic vision and perception, and had in fact collaborated with industry partners such as IMAX and Christie Digital.

As a digital artist, Nell Tenhaaf the then Fine Arts Associate Dean of Research, had successfully collaborated with scientists in her practice, enabling her to liaise between these disparate worlds. Tenhaaf had been approached by Cinespace Film Studios VP Jim Mirkopoulos to explore an industry partnered initiative to build capacity for stereoscopic 3D film production in Toronto. Tenhaaf and Mirkopoulos called what would be a transformative meeting. In attendance were, pioneering industry leaders Bill White from 3D Camera Company, Ken MacNeil from Creative Post, Rob Burton from Arc Productions and Michael Drabot from PS Production Services. Recognizing the potential they were the first among the 12 industry partners to join the consortium and support the research. As veterans in the industry they also recognized the need for capacity building that would support the growing localized expertise in the field.

A key component to this multi-faceted initiative, was led by Professor Janine Marchessault, who gathered a team of scholars to investigate the history of S3D Cinema and reclaim pioneering Canadian contributions to the development of the form, rounding out a comprehensive scope of the project.

Ana Serrano, director of the CFC Media Lab came on board as a vital secondary academic partner, and Side Effects, CASO, IMAX, Christie Digital and Saw 3D, would join to round out the industry-academic enterprise.

Out of these synergies emerged 3D FLIC. Funded by the Ontario Media Development Corporation and the Ontario Centres of Excellence, and managed by Project Director Juana Awad, this unique cross-disciplinary, cross-sector partnership, bridges fundamental research in stereoscopic perception with the development of stereoscopic 3D film language and production, while building the capacity for stereoscopic 3D cinema in Toronto. 3D FLIC is an example of York University’s commitment to interdisciplinary research and innovation.

Key activities
Industry/Community wide knowledge sharing initiatives
A cyclical process of S3D film creation and applied vision research
Vision research on stereoscopic film production and support to industry initiatives
Research on historical and theoretical frameworks

The wider GTA/southern Ontario film production and service clusters will benefit directly from the work of the consortium through: hands-on training, best practices workshops, academic/industry symposia and the upcoming S3D Ontario web portal.

3D FLIC envisions the GTA as a hub for the best quality and most original stereoscopic film production.

The current 3D FLIC Steering Committee members are

Robert Allison
York University Computer Science & Engineering
Professor, Vision Researcher
3D FLIC Project Lead
Christos Giotis
3D FLIC Project Director
Rob Burton
VP Technology Arc Productions
Michael Drabot
General Manager Production Services Toronto
John Helliker
Professor Sheridan College,
Screen Industries Research & Training (SIRT)
Ali Kazimi
York University Film Professor
and lead 3D FLIC filmmaker
Martin Lord
Business Development Manager
Ontario Centres of Excellence Inc.
Wes Liu
President
Computer Animation Studios of Ontario
Kenneth MacNeil
President Creative Post
Jim Mirkopoulos
VP Cinespace Film Studios
Hugh Murray
Senior Vice President Film Production
IMAX Filmed Entertainment
Cristin Barghiel
Director of Product Development
Side Effects Software Inc
Paul Salvini
Chief Technology Officer
Christie Digital
Anna Serrano
CFC Media Lab director
Nell Tenhaaf
York University Fine Arts Professor
James Weyman
Manager, Industry Initiatives Ontario
Media Development Corporation
Bill White
CEO 3D Camera Company
Laurie Wilcox
York University Psychology Professor,
Vision Researcher
Richard Grunberg
Professor / DOP /
Director Ryerson Digital Cinema and Advanced Visualization Lab &
Global Campus Network
Ryerson University

3D FLIC Partners (Phase 2)

Funded by



council denies statue at Main BeachA sculpture previously slated for Main Beach needs to find a new location, the Laguna Beach City Council decided Tuesday night.

The council’s 4 1 vote reversed its initial approval in February for artist Sukhdev Dail’s “Sea Breeze” to stand at the signature beach area. Councilman Kelly Boyd dissented.

The Arts Commission in January recommended the nearly 10 foot tall bronze sculpture, which Dail described as a woman emerging from the ocean with her hair catching the breeze as it morphs into waves.

Residents who said they liked the sculpture argued that the piece should not be placed at a spot as prominent and recognizable as Main Beach. City staff also learned after the February meeting that the city’s general plan discourages, though does not prohibit, the adding of permanent public art at Main Beach.

The plan says, “Encourage the placement of art forms in public places, other than the installations of permanent art forms at Main Beach Park.”

“If I had known about this when it came forward the first time what would I have done?” Councilman Robert Zur Schmiede said. “I would have voted no. I get the comment about, when looking for general plan conformity, it doesn’t require exact precise conformity to each and every applicable goal and policy. When I read this policy . that sounds pretty specific to me.”

Council members also applauded Dail’s work but, except for Boyd, felt that another location would be best.

“This is an accessory in an area that speaks for itself,” Councilwoman Toni Iseman said. “Another location would let the statue take center rather than have it be a secondary thing. It deserves to have that.”

Iseman was also concerned about kids playing on the sculpture if it was at Main Beach, which has three public art pieces: a mural by Terry Thornsley and a bench and bird bath by Marlo Bartels.

“Our view of the beach is the most historic thing we have,” resident Dale Ghere said. “We’re fortunate we don’t have any wells, any big boats close to the coastline. Our beach is pristine and wonderful and we need to preserve that.

“They [arts commissioners] tried to put a surfer at the end of Brooks Street, and the surfers cheap nfl jerseys china went crazy because it was right in front of their view. They want to look at the cheap wholesale jerseys break.”

Arts commissioners defended their decision to place Dail’s sculpture at Main Beach.

“We don’t do plop art,” Commissioner Mary Ferguson said. “We don’t commission a piece, then decide the place. We find the site, go through the approvals, cheap authentic jerseys then try to find the best piece.”

Dail said he harbored no ill feelings after the council’s vote.

“It’s a minor thing,” Dail said. “If it’s placed somewhere close to the beach, I’d be happy.”

Residents suggested “Sea Breeze” could be placed at Jahraus Park, Bluebird Park or across from the Festival of the Arts grounds in an area set aside for a landscaped promenade as part of cheap wholesale jerseys the beautification effort known as the Village Entrance Project.

City Manager John Pietig said the Arts Commission did its job in recommending the piece.

“We as a staff need to improve” our knowledge of general plan policies earlier in the process, Pietig said.

Commenting Policy comments are not regularly monitored by Coastline Pilot staff. Monday through Friday.

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